Tim Ferriss in Seattle - January 27, 2017

Tim Ferriss taught a packed house how to overcome the paralysis of perfectionism, how successful people act, and the most absurd thing he loves to do.

Ferriss' visit to Seattle coincides with the release of his new book, "Tools of Titans."  It was peppered with humor and advice.

At the conclusion of the interview portion of the evening Ferriss participated in a Q&A in front of an audience of 850 in Seattle's Great Hall.

Tim Ferris offered advice on creativity, health and living a successful life during his interview and Q&A session at Seattle's Great Hall on Friday, January 27, 2017. Photos and text by Jeffrey Luke.

Tim Ferris offered advice on creativity, health and living a successful life during his interview and Q&A session at Seattle's Great Hall on Friday, January 27, 2017. Photos and text by Jeffrey Luke.

One audience member asked, "What is one piece of advice you wish people would ask you for?" After a lengthy pause, Ferris said:

"When should I stop taking advice?"

Ferris explained that his goal is to make himself obsolete as quickly as possible. He suggested that people ask themselves: "When should I stop ingesting, and start practicing and creating?"

Tim Ferriss said the one piece of advice he wishes people ask for is "When should I stop taking advice?" He suggests that people ask "When should I stop ingesting, and start practicing and creating?"

Tim Ferriss said the one piece of advice he wishes people ask for is "When should I stop taking advice?" He suggests that people ask "When should I stop ingesting, and start practicing and creating?"

Tim Ferriss interviewed by "Modernist Cuisine" co-author and chef Chris Young at Seattle's Town Hall on Friday, January 27th, 2017. Photo by Jeffrey Luke

Tim Ferriss interviewed by "Modernist Cuisine" co-author and chef Chris Young at Seattle's Town Hall on Friday, January 27th, 2017. Photo by Jeffrey Luke

What is the worst advice Ferriss has ever been given?

Ferris says there are two pieces of advice he disagrees with. First, he doesn't like the line "Fail fast, fail forward" that we get a lot.

"I don't disagree with it in principle if you replace 'fail' with 'iterate.' People have turned somehow failing into this awesome thing. They're like, 'We've pivoted 17 times.'"

"Really?"

"Marc Andreessen said, 'Every time I meet with them It's like watching a rabbit trying to get through a maze - they can't figure out what they're doing. When I was starting out we didn't have a fancy word for it...we called it fuck-up.'"

The second piece of advice Ferriss dislikes is whenever someone tells him to "Lower your standards."

"There are different ways to convey that," Ferris said.  "In almost every case that has been terrible advice. Whenever I have taken that advice, disaster ensues. The only place where that doesn't apply (for me personally) is when I'm trying to write. If I'm finding it torturous, two pages a day is my quota, which is definitely lowering my standards...psychologically this helps me to work."

Ferriss said that when he gives himself a serious goal that requires hard work to accomplish, he also schedules an outrageous, fun goal on his calendar so that he has something to look forward to achieving.

The two best books Ferriss has read this year?
(Links to books below)

"Rebirth" by Kamal Ravikant

"How To Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia" by Mohsin Hamid.

Favorite place he'd like to live outside of San Francisco: Austin, Texas.

Ferriss highly recommends Neil Gaiman's "Make Good Art" speech.

Who was his most memorable podcast guest?

Shaun White, who was on the podcast titled "Magic of Who Cares" (Podcast episode link below)

What would he consider as an alternative profession? Marine Biology. "I wanted to be a marine biologist for about 15 years."

Ferriss' best advice he can give to people who want to lose weight: "Eat slow carb and swing Kettlebells twice a week."

Tim Ferriss demonstrates the most absurd thing that he loves doing. "I like stretching my jaw when I'm feeling stressed."

Tim Ferriss demonstrates the most absurd thing that he loves doing. "I like stretching my jaw when I'm feeling stressed."

When asked the most absurd thing that he loves doing, Ferriss said, "I love, when I'm feeling stressed -- it's kind of a very canine thing to do, and it freaks people out (which is understandable). I like stretching my jaw when I'm feeling stressed. I'm like walking through the airport, I'm kind of wound up so I stretch my jaw like this...and I'll look and there's a woman with her kid and this really horrified look on her face."

Tim Ferriss recommends consistently doing things you're unqualified to do, but attempting to do them very well. These people that I've observed take really good notes and they just try to improve a few percent with each at-bat. He says successful people spend more time trying to build themselves up rather than tearing other people down. They take the a position of what Jocko Willink would call "extreme ownership," and they spend very little time pointing fingers or blaming...they really take it on themselves, which is very difficult, and in some sense is very unfair. We do not live in a fair world: You don't get what you deserve, you get what you negotiate."

Ferriss interviewed many successful people on his podcast, and those interviews provided the fodder for his new book, "Tools of Titans." He suggested two challenges for those who want to improve their lives. "First, consistently doing things you're unqualified to do, but attempting to do them very well. Second, successful people spend more time trying to build themselves up rather than tearing other people down."

Ferriss interviewed many successful people on his podcast, and those interviews provided the fodder for his new book, "Tools of Titans." He suggested two challenges for those who want to improve their lives. "First, consistently doing things you're unqualified to do, but attempting to do them very well. Second, successful people spend more time trying to build themselves up rather than tearing other people down."

Tim Ferriss' current favorite books:

Rebirth by Kamal Ravikant

Ferriss recommends this Neil Gaiman speech:

 
 

 

 

Ferriss' favorite Podcast: Shaun White and the "Magic of Who Cares?"

http://tim.blog/2016/02/18/shaun-white-the-most-unholy-snowboarder-ever/

 

 

 

Photos and text by Jeffrey Luke. While I've quoted as accurately as possible, I apologize in advance for any errors or omissions for which I accept complete responsibility.

Tim Ferriss' ideas to start the year

 

I enjoyed one of Tim Ferriss' most recent podcasts titled "What I learned in 2016." I've included the link to the podcast below if you haven't heard it and would like to check it out.

At the start he says that instead of making New Years Resolutions, he likes to go back over his iCalendar for 2016 and divide experiences into two columns - one had a plus symbol and one a minus symbol.

His reason for doing this exercise was to find the 20% of activities, experiences or people that contributed to 80% of positive emotions. And he wanted to find the 20% that contributed to 80% of his stress, frustration, anger, angst, etc.

I grabbed my Moleskine, filled three pages with my two columns and it was the most productive thing I did to start the year (I literally finished it on New Year's Eve). If you haven't tried it yet, I encourage you to listen to the podcast  and try it yourself!

Tim also said that he wanted to see more sunrises this year.

"If you're having trouble thinking bigger, just think stranger."  --Tim Ferriss

"If you're having trouble thinking bigger, just think stranger."  --Tim Ferriss

One of my favorite lines is "If you're having trouble thinking bigger, just think stranger."


Tim has some great ideas to share about getting your idea and profits to grow fast. He's not about 10% changes and incremental growth. He suggests we do things that can 10x our growth. If we look at Tim's successes with his books, podcast, and many other areas of his life we have to give him credit for having a good feel for how to get noticed.

Tim said he learned two things from Oprah Winfrey after watching the "Making Oprah" documentary.

1. Oprah's core belief is that we have only two emotions LOVE and FEAR.

One of these is causing how you feel at any moment.

2. Don't represent darkness in the world. Another way to frame this is asking yourself, "Am I a force for goodness?"

Tim went on to talk about Seth Godin, including a list of Seth's favorite books. I won't list them all here, but if readers want the list it's all in the podcast linked to below.

The best "take-away" from the Seth Godin commentary was the question to ask yourself: "If I had to charge two times more (for your product or service) and couldn't do any paid advertising, what would I do instead?

He said answering that question is the key to discovery and exploring really cool ways to present your start-up ideas to the world.

Also, I really liked Scott Adam's recent blog post, "Your Body is Your Brain Too." The link is below, and while it is a difficult read because it's counterintuitive, if you read it the ideas will change the way you think and act in the next few days, and probably forever. One of the things that stuck with me is that Scott will not allow stress into his life. If he's in a room, or having a conversation that turns stressful he just leaves. I have made changes in the first week of this year to do the same and I've instantly noticed the improvements in my life.

Having positive changes happen in our lives does not happen by accident. It happens because we consciously make changes in what we do, whether it's exercise, eating right, or surrounding ourselves with positive people.

Here's a fortune that a friend sent me yesterday.

 

Accelerate Your Photo Learning

Girl from dancing troupe photographed in the Dominican Republic. Shot on film without any filters, flash or Photoshop effects. I can teach you the basics I knew when I shot this photo at age 19. Photography works best when your tools are simple. I can teach you everything you need to know to shoot great photos. Photo © Jeffrey Luke

Girl from dancing troupe photographed in the Dominican Republic. Shot on film without any filters, flash or Photoshop effects. I can teach you the basics I knew when I shot this photo at age 19. Photography works best when your tools are simple. I can teach you everything you need to know to shoot great photos. Photo © Jeffrey Luke

When people find out I’m a photographer they quickly tell me that they love photography too, but they only take pictures with their smartphones these days. Then they tell me that they own a DSLR but leave it at home because they haven’t read the manual, and don’t understand the controls. “One day I’m going to take a photo class to learn how to use that camera.”

Yet these same people, when I see them a year later, have never taken the class. What I notice is that people imagine that it takes a long time to learn to use a DSLR to take great photos. First they have to read the manual, then maybe take that class. Then there is all the time to practice. It could take ten years before you finally learn to take amazing photos. But what if you could accelerate your learning process? What if you could learn everything in one hour?

The photo above was easy to take. I was only 19 years old at the time, but I had been learning a lot about photography and my mentors were professional photographers who taught how to take great photos. In this book I share the most important concepts with you.

Photographers have an instinctive understanding of these concepts. In fact, when put to use they seem make photographers look like they have magic powers. The reason more people don’t know about them is that photographers don’t spent much time teaching amateurs, and don’t really know how to explain these important concepts so they can be easily grasped.

I’m good at explaining things in a simple way, and that’s why I wrote this book. If you don’t know the magic concepts to taking great photos why not learn from a photographer who is willing to share them with you?

Many of the books I read about cameras and photography are hundreds of pages long, and many people simply don’t have the time or patience to read a long book when what they really want is to learn quickly, especially when all you really want is to know enough to shoot great photos on your next vacation.

You may think mastering the controls on your DSLR will take a lot of time, but that’s not true. This book helps you learn the important factors quickly. I believe you can learn the important photo concepts in just 60 minutes.

If you want to learn the most important photo concepts to master your DSLR, check out "CAPTAIN OF YOUR CAMERA" available now on Amazon!

New Photography Book: "Captain of your Camera"

 

Captain of your Camera is a book devoted to accelerating your photo learning. If you have a DSLR and have always wanted to take a photo course (but who has the time?) or plan one day to break out that camera manual to learn all of the controls (yeah right!) then this is the perfect book for you.

I believe that your photo learning can be simple, easy, and streamlined. And I think like most learning, if the teaching is done well it shouldn't take a long time. The practicing and refining of technique, yes that takes time.

Yet I think most things can be learned in about 1 hour. I think you can learn all of the important concepts of professional photography - the 12 photo factors is what I call them - so that you can master 80% of what a professional photographer knows - in about an hour.

After reading this book you could probably take a picture that would be pretty close to professional quality. Not quite as good as a professional's (that's why I say you'll be 80% as good).

I encourage you to dream about taking better photos & know we can make it come true. I realize it has been hard to figure out all the controls on your DSLR and that photo classes often give you teaching that doesn’t fit with how you learn. You may fear that learning how to use your DSLR is difficult — but in reality, it’s easy and fun. You are correct: the manual that came with you camera was too confusing! It was written by engineers, not a photographer. That’s why it did not help you. This eBook was written by a photographer to help you learn what really matters. Let me help you ignore the people who obsess about megapixels and the latest cameras. The technical details of a camera have nothing to do with the art of making remarkable images. I want to help you use your camera to make beautiful photos that are pretty close to professional quality. If you would like to buy this book, please type your email into the link below. It's on pre-order and you'll be able to purchase within the next three days. Until then you can buy the Kindle book on Amazon: "Captain of Your Camera" for Kindle.

I encourage you to dream about taking better photos & know we can make it come true. I realize it has been hard to figure out all the controls on your DSLR and that photo classes often give you teaching that doesn’t fit with how you learn. You may fear that learning how to use your DSLR is difficult — but in reality, it’s easy and fun.

You are correct: the manual that came with you camera was too confusing! It was written by engineers, not a photographer. That’s why it did not help you. This eBook was written by a photographer to help you learn what really matters.

Let me help you ignore the people who obsess about megapixels and the latest cameras. The technical details of a camera have nothing to do with the art of making remarkable images.

I want to help you use your camera to make beautiful photos that are pretty close to professional quality.

If you would like to buy this book, please type your email into the link below. It's on pre-order and you'll be able to purchase within the next three days.

Until then you can buy the Kindle book on Amazon: "Captain of Your Camera" for Kindle.

 

Steve Jobs on why computers are like a bicycle for the mind

Steve Jobs said computers are like a bicycle for the mind. Photo by Jeffrey Luke. 

Steve Jobs said computers are like a bicycle for the mind. Photo by Jeffrey Luke. 

I like the visual metaphor that Jobs uses. I love bikes and I'm curious about so much stuff. 

I like this Steve Jobs quote and think you will too.

 "I think one of the things that really separates us from the high primates is that we’re tool builders. I read a study that measured the efficiency of locomotion for various species on the planet. The condor used the least energy to move a kilometer. And, humans came in with a rather unimpressive showing, about a third of the way down the list. It was not too proud a showing for the crown of creation. So, that didn’t look so good. But, then somebody at Scientific American had the insight to test the efficiency of locomotion for a man on a bicycle. And, a man on a bicycle, a human on a bicycle, blew the condor away, completely off the top of the charts.

And that’s what a computer is to me. What a computer is to me is it’s the most remarkable tool that we’ve ever come up with, and it’s the equivalent of a bicycle for our minds.” ~ Steve Jobs

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Finding Focus: Becoming Effective in a Distracted World

Brazilian Heart Surgeon Randas Batista on his ranch in Curitiba, Brazil. Photo by Jeffrey Luke

Brazilian Heart Surgeon Randas Batista on his ranch in Curitiba, Brazil. Photo by Jeffrey Luke

"Have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become. Everything else is secondary."                    

                                                   - Steve Jobs

Lately I have been thinking about ways to make our lives really great. I believe that often we get in our own way sometimes when it comes to creating art, music, products, companies or messages to share with other people. In Steven Pressfield's book The War of Art: Break Through the Blocks & Win Your Inner Creative Battles, he discusses the fear that keeps us from becoming the best versions of ourselves.

"Fear is good. Like self-doubt, fear is an indicator. Fear tells us what we have to do," Pressfield says.

Remember our rule of thumb: The more scared we are of a work or calling, the more sure we can be that we have to do it. 

Resistance is experienced as fear; the degree of fear equates to the strength of Resistance. Therefore the more fear we feel about a specific enterprise, the more certain we can be that that enterprise is important to us and to the growth of our soul. That's why we feel so much Resistance. If it meant nothing to us, there'd be no Resistance.” 

In my own photography lately I have seen a problem pop up. When I was a film photographer, before the age of the Internet, I was better at focusing on doing just one thing at a time. Honestly, life was simpler then and there were fewer distractions. We didn't have cell phones or personal computers, so you could actually immerse yourself in a project for hours without distraction. 

Get Focused

When Bill Gates and Warren Buffett first met, Bill Gates' father had them (and about 20 other people) write down on a sheet of paper one word that they thought accounted for their success.

Reflecting on that occasion, Buffett said, "Bill and I - may have only met twice - didn't know what the other was writing down - we both wrote down the same word, which was 'focus.' And he was focused on software, and I was focused on investments. And it gave me a big advantage to start very young...there's no question about it."

The fast pace of technological innovation inundates us with email, texts, notifications and phone calls every day. I would guess (depending on your job and the modalities you use) that you get 50 different notifications sent your way every day. If you use Snapchat, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, Periscope or YouTube you probably get between 100 and 300 notifications a day. These things aim to derail your focus from meaningful, effective work -- not what you might do for a paycheck, but your personal work that matters, that nobody else can do because of your unique artistic skills, talents, or the knack you have for doing something better than other people. No matter who you are, you are probably really good at something - much better than your peers. Even if you're modest, there is an area where you excel.

"None of us are born as passive generic blobs waiting for the world to stamp its imprint on us," Pressfield said. "Instead we show up possessing already a highly refined and individuated soul.

"Another way of thinking of it is: We're not born with unlimited choices.

"We can't be anything we want to be.

"We come into this world with a specific, personal destiny. We have a job to do, a calling to enact, a self to become. We are who we are from the cradle, and we're stuck with it.

"Our job in this lifetime is not to shape ourselves into some ideal we imagine we ought to be, but to find out who we already are and become it," he said.

The problem I see - and I think the book The One Thing by Gary Keller and Jay Papasan solves - is that we get distracted and try to do many things (aka multitasking) and don't do any of them very well. I am as guilty of this as well as anyone. I have had entire weeks pass this year where I couldn't tell you what I got done. I just took care of the todo lists every day until I survived the day, relaxed at bit in the evening, and then tackled the deluge again. The problem is that I did not accomplish anything artistic, beautiful or remarkable. If you do that for too many years then you can lead an unproductive life. It's not like you're pulling down the human race, but you're not helping it as you might if you made your contribution.

Let me get to the essence of what lies at the heart of this problem. It comes down to two words that we all see or use from time to time: efficient and effective. Think for a moment - can you clearly state the distinction? I could not, so I looked it up and it's beautifully simple: Efficient means doing things the right way, and effective means doing the right things.

What is being efficient?

Being efficient means doing things the right way. If you are efficient about everything you could wind up doing things like rearranging the deck chairs on the Titanic. You want to make sure that you are efficient where it matters, and not waste time being efficient when you should focus on being effective. I think many people crave efficiency, and it has its place in business, car engineering, traffic planning and other areas where intelligent processes and systems save time and energy. And in your personal life, if you have to drive across town to get groceries and go to the bank, it's great if you can remember to go to the hardware store that's located in-between the two rather than have to make another trip because you forgot the hammer. We try to eliminate inefficiency in our own lives for good reason. 

Yet I find myself perfecting the stupidest things from day to day. I can rationalize why I need to spend so much time on certain tasks, but if I'm completely honest with myself I didn't need to spend as much time using my iPhone, even if the apps are somehow useful. I really don't need to be on the iPhone for more than one or two hours a day. But I know (based on my battery constantly needing a charge) that I use that phone a lot. It's entertaining. It's fun. It's crack. But it's not making my life much better (it is fun and it makes me efficient in some ways) in a major way. It keeps me on task, it makes sure I respond to every text, every email, every calendar alert...all the things I have to do every day to be super efficient.

What is being effective?

Being effective means doing the right things. To be effective you need to develop an inner compass that points you in the right direction for your own good, and also an inner alarm clock that warns you when you are about to waste time doing something pointless and distracting.

Consider those people you admire who have achieved some degree of success on a large scale. I'll mention a few of my favorites right here. Some have amazing talents from birth and some of them have worked hard to improve their skills: Ariana Grande's voice, or Roger Federer's forehand, Lindsey Vonn's downhill skiing, Step Curry's jumper, Will Smith's acting, Steve Job's iPhone, Arnold Newman, Gregory Heisler and Dan Winter's photography. Now let's think about their accomplishments and how they became so amazing. Think of the time invested in their training, learning and practice. Think of the thousands of temptations and distractions that they encountered and ignored so they could persist on mastering their skills and honing talents.

These people are some of the most effective on the planet. They are so clear on who they are and what they need to do right now to be better tomorrow. They know their weaknesses and work to strengthen them.

Here is something to remember when it comes to doing things today (and every day). I got this tip from the book 7 Habits of Highly Effective People and it's the third of the most important three "take home" message from reading that book: Make sure you do the important low urgency stuff, because that's the stuff you're most likely to neglect. Think about that. Your day to day life is probably full of stuff that's sapping your time putting out fires, responding to texts and emails and alerts. Whenever you do that you ignore the important things like creating that stunning work of art, composing that song, writing your book, learning to play piano, making that short film you've dreamed about.

Pressfield said, "The most pernicious aspect of procrastination is that it can become a habit. We don't just put off our lives today; we put them off till our deathbed."

Let me show you a cool screenshot that will help you focus: If you check out the image below you'll see the crescent moon. It's the "Do Not Disturb" mode on the iPhone. No matter what phone you may use, there is a way to silence it, whether by using do not disturb, airplane mode or just turning the phone off.

Screenshot from iPhone shows the "Do not disturb" crescent moon icon. If you really want to get work done, just tap this icon or the "Airplane Mode" icon. If you have a different kind of phone just find the relevant mode to shut off alerts...or just power down / turn off your phone.

Screenshot from iPhone shows the "Do not disturb" crescent moon icon. If you really want to get work done, just tap this icon or the "Airplane Mode" icon. If you have a different kind of phone just find the relevant mode to shut off alerts...or just power down / turn off your phone.

Don't Sleepwalk Through Life

I saw a tweet recently by Donald J. Trump that said: "Don't take vacations. What's the point? If you're not enjoying your work, you're in the wrong job." -- Think Like A Billionaire.

This same kind of thinking was mirrored by Warren Buffett who said, "I absolutely advise students - I had 160 students last week, 160 of them from Harvard, South Dakota State - I just tell them, try to find your passion - I mean, you may not find it the first time, but don't sleepwalk through life, find something that you really enjoy doing if you can do it, and not everyone is lucky enough to be able to find that, but it ought to be your goal. To make $10 a week more doing something that you don't feel good about, compared to something you do feel good about - make the change."

Maximus the Husky, just before his 4th birthday on the banks of Lake Washington in Seattle. Photo by Jefffey Luke.

Maximus the Husky, just before his 4th birthday on the banks of Lake Washington in Seattle. Photo by Jefffey Luke.

My advice - if you're not sure yet what you want to do with your life, or if you haven't found your passion yet, is to think about what you love to do most. What would you do if you were the last person left on earth?

Bill Gates made this observation: "The thing you do obsessively between age 13 and 18, that's the thing you have the most chance of being world class at."

  Bill Gates suggests that you think back to your teenage years to identify your true obsessions and figure out the area where you're likely to be "world class."

 

Bill Gates suggests that you think back to your teenage years to identify your true obsessions and figure out the area where you're likely to be "world class."

In closing I'd like to leave you with a passage from the Pressfield's book, because I feel it really captures the essence of ridding our lives of distractions, fears, and the tendency to be efficient instead of being effective. Pressfield's plea to any creative person is to do *the right thing*, whatever that thing is to you.

"Are you a born writer? Were you put on earth to be a painter, a scientist, an apostle of peace? In the end the question can only be answered by action.

Do it or don't do it.

It may help to think of it this way. If you were meant to cure cancer or write a symphony or crack cold fusion and you don't do it, you not only hurt yourself, even destroy yourself. You hurt your children. You hurt me. You hurt the planet.

You shame the angels who watch over you and you spite the Almighty, who created you and only you with your unique gifts, for the sole purpose of nudging the human race one millimeter farther along its path back to God.

Creative work is not a selfish act or a bid for attention on the part of the actor. It's a gift to the world and every being in it. Don't cheat us of your contribution. Give us what you've got.” 

Animal Donut Photo Inspired by Breaking Bad

I had been watching some late night Breaking Bad during the same week I was working on making several Animal Donut photos. I was impressed by the emotional impact of the strong red and blue colors used in one of the episodes, so I incorporated those colors into an Animal Donut photo. 

The process is really easy - you just get the little color gels and place them over the flash unit. If you're interested in finding out what gels I use, then just check below. Many companies sell gels (basically colored plastic that's used commonly in movies and theater to color light) for photography. All you need is some way to attach the gel to the front of your flash. You can use velcro that you attach yourself, or you can buy gels that include a mounting system (like the kind below).

The key to getting the colors to work well is to make sure that your flash is not mounted to the camera  - they should be to the sides, above or below the camera. You can experiment with different colors and positions of flash units. There is not rule for what works, and it's best to play around with different combinations until you find one that works.

If you have any questions about achieving effects like this, send me an email or post a comment to the Animal Donut Instagram page.

 

Introducing the Animal Donut Podcast

The Animal Donut Podcast rolled out its first episodes this week. Today's episode is all about contrast: what it is and how it affects our photos. We compare two music videos and the quality of audio and video recording.

One music videos of Steely Dan that feature the drumming of Keith Carlock is used as examples of what happens when audio levels are not controlled, and another video shows careful attention to audio levels.

This video captures spirit of show but drum beat is audibly distorted and light areas (Donald Fagan's face) are optically distorted. Even though the sound and video are distorted in this video, there is more light on the drummer, Keith Carlock, so it's easier to see him in this video compared to the video below.

This video of Steely Dan's Donald Fagan performing a song from his solo album "Sunken Condominium" demonstrates careful control of audio and video recording. You can clearly hear Keith Carlock's (same drummer in top video) bass drum and see the performers' faces.

It should be noted that while neither the audio nor the video recordings are distorted, Keith Carlock has very little light on him in the Letterman video. He's almost fades into the background because he has no special lights aimed at him. In comparison, Donald Fagan is nicely lit.

The podcast talks about the challenges of "Fitting and elephant into a doghouse," which is an analogy for cramming a wide dynamic range of sound or light into a small space (an audio recording or a photograph). 

If you'd like a free light of the lighting equipment used for the Animal Donut photos you can download this free checklist: animaldonut.com/checklist

 

 

This is the voice recorder used for the Animal Donut podcast. It's easy to use, reliable and the sound quality is impressive.

 

Photographer Shoots Atop Sea Turtle

This is smooth sailing because Sea Turtles are good swimmers and you hardly ever fall off.

This is smooth sailing because Sea Turtles are good swimmers and you hardly ever fall off.

This Sea Turtle is going after a coconut donut. The original photo has a Panda in the donut hole. If you look carefully you can see a bit of panda in there...it looks like chocolate, but it's not. Panda was sliding off the donut, but after looking at this photo carefully I decided it added complexity to the photo. I like it just like this. The shredded coconut looks like some underwater turtle treat.